Film Course Descriptions

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Upper-Disivion ClassesGraduate Classes

Lower Division Courses

19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars (1)
Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.
M50. Introduction to Visual Culture (5)
(Same as English M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Study of how visual media, including advertising, still and moving images, and narrative films, influence contemporary aesthetics, politics, and knowledge. P/NP or letter grading.
72. Production Practice in Film, Television, and Digital Media (2 to 4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Exploration of research, analysis, and conceptualization of dramatic narrative and laboratory experience in one or more various aspects of contemporary production and postproduction practices for entertainment media, including theater, film, video, and digital media. May be repeated for maximum of 8 units. Letter grading.
89. Honors Seminars (1)
Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.
99. Student Research Program (1 to 2)
Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

Upper Division Classes

100A. Junior Symposium (1 to 2)
(Formerly numbered 100.) Laboratory, three hours. Limited to Film and Television majors. Structured forum in which undergraduate juniors meet on regular basis to discuss curricular issues, meet with faculty members, and have exposure to array of guest speakers from within film industry. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Letter grading.
100B. Senior Symposium (1 to 2)
Laboratory, three hours. Requisite: course 100A. Limited to Film and Television majors. Structured forum in which undergraduate seniors meet on regular basis to discuss curricular issues, meet with faculty members, and have exposure to array of guest speakers from within film and television industry. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Letter grading.
101. Story and Style: Theory and Practices of Filmmaking (5)
Lecture, three hours; screenings, three hours. Systematic analysis of how filmmakers use sound and image to tell stories on screen. Viewing of selected films as case studies to understand relationship of theory to practice and to develop skills in critical thinking, analytical writing, and strategies for creating original film and video productions. P/NP or letter grading.
106A. History of American Motion Picture (6)
Lecture/screenings, eight hours; discussion, one hour. Historical and critical survey, with examples, of American motion picture both as developing art form and as medium of mass communication. May be repeated once for credit with consent of department and topic change. Letter grading.
106B. History of European Motion Picture (6)
Lecture/screenings, eight hours; discussion, one hour. Historical and critical survey, with examples, of European motion picture both as developing art form and as medium of mass communication. May be repeated once for credit with consent of department and topic change. Letter grading.
106C. History of African, Asian, and Latin American Film (6)
Lecture/screenings, eight hours; discussion, one hour. Critical, historical, aesthetic, and social study -- together with exploration of ethnic significance -- of Asian, African, Latin American, and Mexican films. Letter grading.
107. Experimental Film (6)
Lecture/screenings, eight hours; discussion, one hour. Study and analysis of unconventional developments in motion pictures. P/NP or letter grading.
108. History of Documentary Film (6)
Lecture/screenings, eight hours; discussion, one hour. Philosophy of documentary approach in motion pictures. Development of critical standards and examination of techniques of teaching and persuasion used in selected documentary, educational, and propaganda films. Letter grading.
110A. American Television History (5)
Lecture/screenings, five hours; discussion, one hour. Critical survey of American television history from its inception to present. Examination of interrelationships between program forms, industrial paradigms, social trends, and culture. Starting with television's hybrid origins in radio, theater, and film, contextualization, viewing, and discussion of key television shows, as well as Hollywood films that comment on radio and television. Consideration of television programs and series in terms of sociocultural issues (consumerism, lifestyle, gender, race, national identity) and industrial practice (programming, policy, regulation, business). Letter grading.
110C. World Media Systems (4)
Lecture/viewing, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 110A. Designed for juniors/seniors. Global analysis of internal and external broadcasting services, with emphasis on their motives, origins, technologies, and programming. Special attention to political, economic, and regulatory constraints and common world media issues. P/NP or letter grading.
M111. Women and Film (6)
(Same as Gender Studies M111.) Lecture, eight hours; discussion, one hour. Historical issues and critical approaches to women and cinema that may include authorship, stardom, female genres, and images of women in Hollywood cinema, alternative cinema, and independent cinema from silent era to present. Letter grading.
112. Film and Social Change (6)
Lecture/screenings, eight hours; discussion, one hour. Development of documentary and dramatic films in relation to and as force in social development. Letter grading.
113. Film Authors (6)
Lecture/screenings, eight hours; discussion, one hour. In-depth study of specific film author (director or writer). May be repeated once for credit with consent of department and topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
113A. Film Directors: Hitchcock and His Influence (5)
Lecture/screenings, five hours; discussion, one hour. Study of films of Alfred Hitchcock and influence he has had on other filmmakers. Lectures and screenings of Hitchcock films in first seven weeks, with coverage of films that are closely patterned after Hitchcock's in last three weeks. P/NP or letter grading.
113B. Film Authors: Women Filmmakers (5)
Lecture, five hours; discussion, one hour. Consideration of contributions to world cinema made by women directors, with focus on women directors working in various eras and modes of production (e.g., silent cinema, industry cinema, avant garde) with specific investigations of several auteurs, specifically Dorothy Azner, Jane Campion, and Cheryl Dunye. P/NP or letter grading.
114. Film Genres (5)
Lecture/screenings, five hours; discussion, one hour. Study of specific film genre (e.g., Western, gangster cycle, musical, silent epic, comedy, social drama). May be repeated once for credit with consent of department and topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
115. Stylistic Studies for Moving Image: Theory and Practice (6)
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Drawing heavily on wide array of historical examples, examination of many expressive strategies potentially usable in creation of moving image art forms: iconography, editing, composition, kinesthetics, sound, narrative, discourse, and performance. Letter grading.
116. Film Criticism (4)
Lecture, four hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Study of and practice in film criticism. P/NP or letter grading.
M117. Chicanos in Film/Video (5)
(Same as Chicana and Chicano Studies M114.) Lecture/screenings, five hours; discussion, one hour. Goal is to gain nuanced understanding of Chicano cinema as political, socioeconomic, cultural, and aesthetic practice. Examination of representation of Mexican Americans and Chicanos in four Hollywood genres -- silent "greaser" films, social problem films, Westerns, and gang films -- that are major genres that account for films about or with Mexican Americans produced between 1908 and 1980. Examination of recent Chicano-produced films that subvert or signify on these Hollywood genres, including "Zoot Suit," "Ballad of Gregorio Cortez," and "Born in East L.A." Consideration of shorter, more experimental work that critiques Hollywood image of Chicanos. Guest speakers include both pioneer and up-and-coming filmmakers. P/NP or letter grading.
C118. Intermediate Cinematography (4)
Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 100A, 150, 185. Intermediate study of principles of cinematography, with emphasis on exposure, lighting, and selection of film, camera, and lenses. Concurrently scheduled with course C416. Letter grading.
C120. Digital Cinematography (4)
Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 100A, 185. Advanced study of principles of digital cinematography, with emphasis on electronic exposure control, lighting, formats, cameras, and lenses. Concurrently scheduled with course C420. Letter grading.
122B. Introduction to Art and Technique of Filmmaking (4)
(Formerly numbered 188B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Students acquire understanding of practical and aesthetic challenges undertaken by artists and professionals in making of motion pictures and television. Examination of film as both art and industry: storytelling, sound and visual design, casting and performance, editing, finance, advertising, and distribution. Exploration of American and world cinema from filmmaker's perspective. Honing of analytical skills and development of critical vocabulary for study of filmmaking as technical, artistic, and cultural phenomenon. P/NP or letter grading.
122C. Design and Experimental Digital Film Production (4)
(Formerly numbered 188C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Students conceive, write, polish, shoot, and edit short digital experimental movies and crew on classmate projects. Experimentation with image, sound, and montage; examination of scenes from feature films and experimental short subjects. By end of term, students have one- to three-minute digital films with titles and sound track. P/NP or letter grading.
122D. Film Editing: Overview of History, Technique, and Practice (4)
(Formerly numbered 188D.) Lecture, three hours. Practical application of film editing techniques, how they have evolved, and continue to evolve. Examination of history of editing, as well as current editing trends, terminology, and workflow. P/NP or letter grading.
122E. Digital Cinematography (4)
(Formerly numbered 188E.) Lecture, three hours. With lectures, screenings, and demonstrations, study of principles of digital cinematography. How tools and techniques affect visual storytelling process. Topics include formats, aspect ratios, cameras, lenses, special effects, internal menu picture manipulation, lighting, composition, coverage, high definition, digital exhibition, filtration, multiple-camera shooting. P/NP or letter grading.
122I. Writing for Animation Series (5)
(Formerly numbered 188I.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to craft and business of writing animation for television. Overview of history of animation produced specifically for this medium, along with its many formats. Business model has changed radically over past five decades, as have types of shows that have been created. Designed to put shows in historical perspective, with eye toward where industry is heading given changes in technology and continuing (and growing) scrutiny of outside forces such as corporations and FCC. Letter grading.
122J. Disney Feature: Then and Now (5)
(Formerly numbered 188J.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, three hours. Study and analysis of Disney's animated features. Evaluation of why Disney's animated features have dominated until recently and ramifications of this dominance on animation and society. Letter grading.
122K. Visual Effects (4)
(Formerly numbered 188K.) Lecture, three hours. Nearly every film employs some form of visual effects, whether in reconstructing backdrop of history, creating futuristic or fantasy world, or simply fixing weather or production problems. Discussion of evolution of visual effects, as well as problems and blessings inherent in constantly evolving technology. Top visual effects consultants to be guest lecturers. P/NP or letter grading.
122M. Film and Television Directing (4)
(Formerly numbered 188M.) Lecture, three hours. Through discussions, screenings, demonstrations, and guests, exploration of script, previsualization, directing actors, directing camera coverage in relationship to story, practical on-set directing, and directing for camera. P/NP or letter grading.
122N. History of Animation in American Film and Television (5)
(Formerly numbered 188N.) Lecture, six hours. Survey of art of animation in America from its precinema origins to recent films of Disney, Pixar, DreamWorks, Ghibli, and others. Place of animation in pop culture, racial imagery and ethnic stereotypes, growth of art form, and how it reflects American society. P/NP or letter grading.
126. Acting for Film and Television (4)
Studio, six hours. Projects in acting for television, video, and film. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
128. Media and Ethnicity (4)
Lecture, four hours. Utilizing Asian American experience, exploration of impact and uses of media on contemporary American ethnic communities. Role and techniques of media influence besides community utilization and production. P/NP or letter grading.
CM129. Contemporary Topics in Theater, Film, and Television (2)
(Same as Theater CM129.) Lecture, two hours; screenings, two hours. Limited to junior/senior and graduate theater/film and television students. Examination of creative process in theater, film, and television, with consideration of writing, direction, production, and performance. Overview of individual contributions in collaborative effort; examination of distinctiveness and interrelations among these arts. Individual units include participation of leading members of theater, film, and television professions. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course CM229. P/NP or letter grading.
131. Nontheatrical Screenwriting for Film and Television (4 or 8)
Discussion, three hours. Research and writing of documentary, technical, educational, industrial, and propaganda scripts. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units. P/NP or letter grading.
C132. Screenwriting Fundamentals (2)
(Formerly numbered 130A.) Lecture, one hour. Corequisite for graduate students enrolled in course 431. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 133 (or former course 130B or 130C prior to Fall Quarter 2008). Examination of screenwriting fundamentals: structure, character and scene development, conflict, locale, theme, history of drama. Review of authors such as Aristotle. Concurrently scheduled with course C430. P/NP or letter grading.
133. In-Depth Introduction to Fundamentals of Screenwriting (4)
(Formerly numbered 130B.) Lecture, one hour; discussion, one hour. Not open for credit to students with credit for course C132/C430 (or former course 130A). Structural analysis of feature films and development of professional screenwriters' vocabulary for constructing, deconstructing, and reconstructing their own work. Screenings of films and selected film sequences in class and by assignment. P/NP or letter grading.
134. Intermediate Screenwriting Workshop (4)
(Formerly numbered 130C.) Seminar, three hours. Problems in film and television writing. P/NP or letter grading.
135A. Advanced Screenwriting Workshop (8)
Laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 100A, 133, 185. Course 135A is requisite to 135B, which is requisite to 135C. Course in film and television writing. First act of original screenplay to be developed. Letter grading.
135B. Advanced Screenwriting Workshop (8)
Laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 100A, 133, 135A, 185. Course in film and television writing. Second act of original screenplay to be developed. Letter grading.
135C. Advanced Screenwriting Workshop (8)
Laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 100A, 133, 135B, 185. Course in film and television writing. Third act of original screenplay to be developed. Letter grading.
140. Interactive Expression (4)
Lecture, six hours. Introduction to history and practice of interactive media, with emphasis on uniqueness of computer-mediated expression. Letter grading.
C142. Digital Imagery and Visualization (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Introductory hands-on investigation of techniques of digital still imaging and aesthetics of digital image, in context of examining dynamics of cultural constructions and visual codes. Students conceive and produce several digital image visualizations. Concurrently scheduled with course C242. Letter grading.
C143. Moving Digital Image (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Investigation of different ways of creating and manipulating linear moving images (digital video) on desktop computers, exploring both creative and theoretical aspects of this production environment. Students conceive and produce number of short projects. Concurrently scheduled with course C243. Letter grading.
C144. Interactive Multimedia Authoring (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Introduction to expressive and aesthetic potential of interactive digital media and its theoretical issues. Exploration of methodologies and tools for media integration, interface design, and interactive audiovisual construction. Students conceive, produce, and master individual interactive multimedia projects. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C244. Letter grading.
C145. Creative Authoring for World Wide Web (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Exploration of creative aspects of World Wide Web as medium for personal/collective expression. Students produce Web works and serve them online. Contextualization of medium by looking at its history, embedded ideology, and sociopolitical consequences. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C245. Letter grading.
146. Art and Practice of Motion Picture Producing (4)
Lecture, three hours. Exploration of role of producer as both artist and business person. Comparative analysis of screenplays and completed films. Emphasis on assembly of creative team and analysis of industrial context, both independent and studio. Screenings viewed outside of class and on reserve at Powell Library. Letter grading.
C147. Planning Independent Feature Production (4)
Lecture, three hours. Analysis of procedure, problems, and budgets in planning feature-length script for film and television production, with emphasis on role of producer and creative organizational techniques of producing. Concurrently scheduled with course C247. Letter grading.
C148. Advanced Digital Media Workgroup (4)
Discussion, four hours; laboratory, two hours. Designed for students with previous laboratory course experience, course provides opportunity to create larger-scale digital media works with advanced software tools and techniques in small process-oriented, creative workshop environment. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C248. Letter grading.
C149A. Music in Film: Another Way to Tell Stories (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course C149A is requisite to C149B. Exploration of concepts and issues that drive creation and use of music in film. Through lecture/discussion and practical assignments, examination of deep collaboration between filmmaker and composer. Viewing of noteworthy examples and following of collaboration of filmmakers with composers, with weekly sessions dedicated to temping, creation and development of new scores, studio visits, and creative/conceptual dialogue between musician and filmmaker. Preparation of film ready for temping by end of first term and ready for scoring at beginning of second term. Concurrently scheduled with course C455A. Letter grading.
C149B. Music in Film: Another Way to Tell Stories (4)
Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course C149A. Exploration of concepts and issues that drive creation and use of music in film. Through lecture/discussion and practical assignments, examination of deep collaboration between filmmaker and composer. Viewing of noteworthy examples and following of collaboration of filmmakers with composers, with weekly sessions dedicated to temping, creation and development of new scores, studio visits, and creative/conceptual dialogue between musician and filmmaker. Preparation of film ready for temping by end of first term and ready for scoring at beginning of second term. Concurrently scheduled with course C455B. Letter grading.
150. Cinematography (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 100A, 185. Limited to Film and Television majors. Introduction to image control in motion picture photography through exposure, lighting, and selection of film, camera, and lens. Supervised projects in photography to complement material covered in lecture. Letter grading.
151. Introduction to Experimental Filmmaking (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Limited to Film and Television majors. Techniques of image manipulation, design, and art direction. Production and completion of exercise (no longer than three minutes), using 16mm nonsync sound film. May be repeated twice for credit. Letter grading.
152. Film and Television Sound Recording (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Limited to Film and Television majors. Introduction to principles and practices of film and television sound recording, including supervised exercises. P/NP or letter grading.
C152C. Digital Audio Postproduction (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Limited to departmental majors. Through discussion, demonstrations, and laboratory assignments, exploration of digital audio tools and procedures available to today's filmmakers. Coverage of many technical, equipment, and software step-by-steps, with emphasis on creative process. Concurrently scheduled with course C452C. Letter grading.
153. Motion Picture Lighting (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 100A, 150, 185. Limited to Film and Television majors. Introduction to principles and tools of lighting used in visual storytelling through lectures, discussions, and screenings. Creative lighting techniques covering topics such as people, environment, spatial relationships, movement, color, special effects, and continuity. Letter grading.
154. Film Editing (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 100A, 185. Limited to Film and Television majors. Introduction to artistic and technical problems of film editing, with practical experience in editing of image and synchronous sound. Letter grading.
C154B. Advanced Film Editing (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: submission of rough cut of existing project or proposal to edit work of another director. Requisites: courses 100A, 154, 185. Limited to Film and Television majors in postproduction phase with advanced knowledge of organization and operation of postproduction process. Students may also propose to edit significant scene given to them by instructor. Concurrently scheduled with course C454B. Letter grading.
155. Introduction to Digital Media and Tools (4)
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, one hour. Requisites: courses 100A, 185. Limited to Film and Television majors. Instruction and exercises in basic concepts and software of virtual production environments and digital postproduction tools. Letter grading.
163. Directing Cameras (4)
Laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 100A, 185. Limited to Film and Television majors. Investigation of expressive potential of image within and beyond narrative from directorial perspective. Experiments with working methodologies that stimulate visual creativity and positioning image as fundamental element of cinematic expression. Letter grading.
164. Directing Actors (4)
Laboratory, four hours. Exercises in analysis of script and character for purpose of directing actors. Emphasis on eliciting best possible performance from actors. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
165. Advanced Narrative Television Directing (4)
Laboratory, six hours. Requisites: courses 134, 185. Limited to Film and Television majors. Supervised exercises in television multicamera direction, with emphasis on creative use of cameras, sound, composition, and communication with those in front of and behind camera. May be repeated twice for credit. Letter grading.
C168. Creative Location Film Production (8)
Lecture, four hours; discussion, four hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Limited to directing or producer's program students. Problems of location, production, directing, and cinematography in various real-life practical locations. Practical application of solving problems and communication within limitations of production experience. Concurrently scheduled with course C468. Letter grading.
C170A. Introduction to Digital Effects (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Introductory study of digital effects production, with specific focus on motion graphics, compositing, effects processing, and title sequences. Concurrently scheduled with course C470A. Letter grading.
175A. Undergraduate Film Production (8)
Lecture, four hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 100A, 185. Limited to Film and Television majors. Writing, preproduction, and production for short film. P/NP or letter grading.
175B. Undergraduate Film Production (4 to 8)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: courses 100A, 185. Limited to Film and Television majors. Completion of postproduction (editing, creation of sound tracks) for short film begun in course 175A. P/NP or letter grading.
176A. Advanced Undergraduate Video Production (8)
Discussion, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Requisite: course 185. Limited to Film and Television majors. Completion of video production (no more than 20 minutes), including its writing, production, and editing. Letter grading.
176B. Advanced Undergraduate Video Production (4 to 8)
Discussion, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Requisite: course 185. Limited to Film and Television majors. Completion of video production (no more than 20 minutes), including its writing, production, and editing. Letter grading.
M177. Film and Television Acting Workshop (2)
(Same as Theater M178.) Laboratory, four hours. Workshop providing opportunities for students to rehearse, perform, and evaluate scenes. Three different production styles to which performers may need to adjust are (1) preproduction rehearsals with director, (2) single-camera experience, and (3) multiple-camera experience. May be repeated twice for credit. Letter grading.
178. Film and Television Production Laboratory (2 or 4)
Laboratory, to be arranged. Supervised laboratory experience in various aspects of film and television production. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units, but only 8 units may be applied toward Film and Television major. Letter grading.
181A. Introduction to Animation (5)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Drawing experience not required. Fundamentals of animation through preparation of short animated film. P/NP or letter grading.
181B. Writing for Animation (4 or 8)
Lecture, six hours; studio, to be arranged. Requisite: course 181A. Research and practice in creative writing and planning for animated film. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. P/NP or letter grading.
181C. Animation Workshop (4 or 8)
Lecture, six hours; studio, to be arranged. Preparation: storyboard at first class meeting. Requisite: course 181A. Organization and integration of various creative arts used in animation to form complete study of selected topic. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. P/NP or letter grading.
183A. Producing I: Film and Television Development (4)
Lecture, three hours. Open to nonmajors. Critical analysis of contemporary entertainment industries and practical approach to understanding and implementing producer's role in development of feature film and television scripts. Through scholarly and trade journal readings, in-class discussions, script analysis, and select guest speakers, exposure to various entities that comprise feature film and television development process. Basic introduction to story and exploration of proper technique for evaluating screenplays and teleplays through writing of coverage. May be taken independently for credit. Letter grading.
183B. Producing II: Entertainment Economics (4)
Lecture, three hours. Open to nonmajors. Critical understanding of strategies and operating principles that drive flow of revenue in entertainment industry. Exploration of theoretical frameworks and development of critical perspective, while studying industrial processes through which movie and television properties are financed and exploited throughout all revenue streams. May be taken independently for credit. Letter grading.
183C. Producing III: Marketing, Distribution, and Exhibition (4)
Lecture, three hours. Open to nonmajors. Marketing and distribution of feature films across multiple exhibition platforms and subsequent reception and consumption by audiences. Focus on engagement between distributor, exhibitor, and audience and analysis of various conceptual frameworks and industrial strategies within which these relationships are conceived and operate. May be taken independently for credit. Letter grading.
184A. Overview of Contemporary Film Industry (4)
(Formerly numbered 184.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of evolving economic structures and business practices in contemporary Hollywood film industry, with emphasis on operations of studios and independent distribution companies, their development, marketing, and distribution systems, and their relationship to independent producers, talent, and agencies. Letter grading.
184B. Overview of Contemporary Television Industry (4)
Lecture, three hours. Examination of evolving economic structures and business practices in contemporary Hollywood television industry, with emphasis on operations of networks and cable companies, series development, marketing, and network branding from 1947 to present. Letter grading.
185. Undergraduate Television and Video Production (6)
Laboratory, six hours. Limited to Film and Television majors. Instruction and exercises in basic techniques of television and video production. Letter grading.
186A. Introduction to Documentary Production (4)
(Formerly numbered 186.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours; fieldwork, four to six hours. Course 186A is requisite to 186B, which is requisite to 186C. Limited to Film and Television majors. Introductory viewing and discussion of selected documentaries and instruction in various production skills necessary to create video documentaries. Completion of series of exercises from conceptualization through postproduction, culminating in production of short documentary. Letter grading.
186B. Intermediate Documentary Production Workshop (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours; fieldwork, four to six hours. Requisite: course 186A. Limited to Film and Television majors. Intermediate viewing and discussion of selected documentaries and instruction in various production skills necessary to create video documentaries. Completion of series of exercises from conceptualization through postproduction, culminating in production of short documentary. Letter grading.
186C. Advanced Documentary Production Workshop (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours; fieldwork, four to six hours. Requisite: course 186B. Limited to Film and Television majors. Advanced viewing and discussion of selected documentaries and instruction in various production skills necessary to create video documentaries. Completion of series of exercises from conceptualization through postproduction, culminating in production of short documentary. Letter grading.
187A. Producing and Directing Remote Multicamera Production (4)
Lecture/laboratory, three hours (additional hours to be arranged). Professionally oriented lecture/laboratory/field workshop course designed to provide disciplined planning, responsible leadership, and organizational and problem-solving skills required in deadline remote production. Emphasis on clarity of vision, storytelling, effective execution of pitch, preproduction, shoot, and editorial. Letter grading.
187B. Producing and Directing Remote Multicamera Production (6)
Lecture/laboratory, three hours (additional hours to be arranged). Instruction and supervised productions of remote experience, with focus on development and execution of concept. Experience closely patterned after professional experiences in working with talent, production venues, and production logistics of remote on-location video programs. Letter grading.
187C. Producing and Directing Remote Multicamera Production (6)
Lecture/laboratory, three hours (additional hours to be arranged). Instruction and supervised productions of remote experience, with focus on development and execution of concept. Experience closely patterned after professional experiences in working with talent, production venues, and production logistics of remote on-location video programs. Letter grading.
188A. Special Courses in Film, Television, and Digital Media (4)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Special topics in film, television, and digital media for undergraduate students taught on experimental or temporary basis. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
189. Advanced Honors Seminars (1)
Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.
193A. Film Curatorship (4)
Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Study of principles and techniques of film curatorship and research, including but not limited to acquisitions, cataloging, storage, and retrieval systems. Special attention to application of new technology, equipment, and program materials to film archival-library design for research and teaching. P/NP or letter grading.
193B. Television Curatorship (4)
Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Study of principles and techniques of television curatorship and research, including but not limited to acquisitions, cataloging, storage, and retrieval systems. Special attention to application of new technology, equipment, and program materials to television archival-library design for research and teaching. P/NP or letter grading.
195. Corporate Internships in Film, Television, and Digital Media (2 to 6)
Tutorial, to be arranged; fieldwork, 14 to 20 hours. Enforced corequisite: course 183A or 183B or 183C. Limited to juniors/seniors. Corporate internship in supervised setting in business related to film, television, and digital media industries. Students meet on regular basis with instructor and provide periodic reports of their experience. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP grading.
199. Directed Research or Senior Project in Film, Television, and Digital Media (2 to 8)
Tutorial, three hours. Limited to senior Film and Television majors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be taken for maximum of 8 units. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

Graduate Courses

200. Seminar: Bibliography and Methods of Research in Film and Television (6)
Seminar, three hours; laboratory, four to six hours (additional screenings and/or video laboratory work as required). Designed for graduate students. Examination and study of research methods, techniques, and resources related to film and television research, including development of computer skills for preparation of bibliographies, online database searching and retrieval and, when appropriate, use of computer/videodisc technology for research. Letter grading.
201A. Seminar: Media Industries and Cultures of Production -- Foundations (6)
(Formerly numbered 201.) Seminar, three hours; film screenings, three hours. Critical survey of various scholarly traditions and methods (ethnographic, sociological, political-economic, geographic) that have been used to study film and television production practices as cultural, social, and industrial phenomena, as basis for individual student research projects. Letter grading.
201B. Seminar: Media Industries and Cultures of Production -- Transmedia (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, three hours. Requisite: course 201A. Examination of contemporary production studies research and transmedia practices, including innovations in marketing, licensing, distribution, industrial organization, creative work, new technologies, and evolving relations between fans and producers in digital economy. Letter grading.
202. Seminar: Media Audiences and Cultures of Consumption (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, three hours. Critical study of reception and use of television and electronic media and examination of theoretical approaches to culture and audience research. Consideration of issues of cultural taste, consumerism, style/lifestyle, identity, and relationships between audience, industry, and mass-marketed images/commodities. Letter grading.
203. Seminar: Film and Other Arts (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Studies in interrelationships between film and fine arts, or performing arts, or literature, with emphasis on ways these other arts have influenced film. May be repeated twice for credit. S/U or letter grading.
204. Seminar: Visual Analysis (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, two to four hours. Study of visual analysis (or textual analysis), using DVD accessing features, as approach to learning what makes film great and distinct art form. Exploration of role of visual style in narrative fiction filmmaking to attempt to understand some ways it can operate. Letter grading.
205. Seminar: Creating Visual Essays for Film History and Analysis (6)
Seminar, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Prior technical knowledge not required. Creation of individual original research projects in film/television history and analysis destined for audio-visual medium, finalized as high-resolution DVDs. Projects may be extensions of research intended for print publication, dissertation chapters, conference presentations, teaching, etc. Equal emphasis on acquiring basic skills needed to create visual essays and on methods of research for this new form of scholarly research. Comparison of limits and advantages of print versus audio-visual publication. Use of Adobe Production Suite. Letter grading.
206A. Seminar: European Film History (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Studies in different periods of European cinemas or movements. Topics may include Italian neorealism, French film of 1930s, French New Wave and crime film, Weimar cinema, and Soviet silent cinema. See annual departmental listings for special topics. May be repeated twice for credit with topic change. Letter grading.
206B. Seminar: Selected Topics in American Film History (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, three hours. Seminar with focus on specific topic or period in American film history. Letter grading.
206C. Seminar: American Film History (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four hours. Introduction to industrial, social, and aesthetic history of American film. Letter grading.
206D. Seminar: Silent Film (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, two to four hours. Discussion of silent film from its beginning in 1895 to transition to sound cinema in 1927 to 1930. Film viewings discussed in terms of genre, national cinema, formal developments, and directors. Readings on film historical and theoretical issues. Letter grading.
207. Seminar: Experimental Film (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Studies of form, style, politics, and history of experimental, innovative, avant-garde, and minority film and video. Letter grading.
208A. Seminar: Film Structure (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Examination of various film conventions, both fictional and nonfictional, and of role of structure in motion picture. S/U or letter grading.
208B. Seminar: Classical Film Theory (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four hours. Study of principal topics and lines of inquiry that characterize theoretical writings of Arnheim, Eisenstein, Bazin, Kracauer, etc. Letter grading.
208C. Seminar: Contemporary Film Theory (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Requisite: course 208B. Designed for graduate students. Study of redefinition of aims and methods of film theory through contemporary writings. S/U or letter grading.
209A. Seminar: Documentary Film (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Nonfictional film and its relation to contemporary culture. S/U or letter grading.
209B. Seminar: Fictional Film (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Film as fiction and its relation to contemporary culture. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.
209D. Seminar: Animated Film (4)
Seminar, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Critical study of animated film: its historical development, structure, style, use, and relation to contemporary culture. S/U or letter grading.
210. Seminar: Contemporary Broadcast Media (4)
Seminar, three hours (additional hours as required). Designed for graduate students. Consideration of issues raised by recent developments in television and radio, commercial and public, associated with innovations in satellite, cable, and cartridge systems. S/U or letter grading.
211A. Seminar: Historiography (4)
Seminar, three hours. Limited to Film and Television M.A. candidates. Beginning examination of function and methods of writing film and television history as seen in works of key historians in U.S. and Europe. S/U or letter grading.
211B. Seminar: Historiography (4)
Seminar, three hours. Limited to Film and Television Ph.D. candidates. Examination of function and methods of writing film and television history as exemplified by key works in this tradition, with attention to central issues of historical thought on media. S/U or letter grading.
212. Cinema and Media Studies Graduate Colloquium (2)
Lecture, two hours. Exchange with scholars inside and outside department through lectures and academic paper presentation and offers students practice in presenting papers for professional conferences, CV writing seminars, job market/interview preparation seminars, and discussion of current topics and trajectory of area of cinema and media studies. May be repeated for maximum of 14 units. S/U grading.
215. Seminar: Theory and Method (6)
Seminar, three hours. Limited to Film and Television Ph.D. candidates. Examination of major modes of theoretical reflection that bear on film and television through study of central texts of such traditions as phenomenology, auteurism, semiology, psychoanalysis, sociology, etc. S/U or letter grading.
217A. Seminar: American Television History (6)
Seminar, three hours; screenings, four hours. Critical survey of U.S. television industry from its inception to present. Examination of programming and changes within industry by considering range of technological, economic, aesthetic, social, and cultural dimensions. Letter grading.
217B. Seminar: Selected Topics in Television History (6)
Seminar, three hours; screenings, three hours. Advanced critical seminar, with focus on specific topic or area (historical period, industry, programming, genre, or social formation) in domestic or international television. Letter grading.
218. Seminar: Culture, Media, and Society (6)
Seminar, three hours; screenings/discussion, four hours. Emphasis on discourse of other(s). Thematization of other is concerned with theories of difference rather than similarity or identity -- with how other cultures enter into politics of representation and representation of politics through metaphors of (1) difference without opposition, (2) heterogeneity without hierarchy, and/or (3) otherness without ethnocentrism. Examination of how women, national minorities, and Third World peoples have been rendered others; place of cinematic apparatus in this process and how academization of others is positioned vis-à-vis mainstream critical discourse. Letter grading.
219. Seminar: Film and Society (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Study of ways film affects and is affected by social behavior, belief, and value systems; considered in relation to role of media in society. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.
220. Seminar: Television and Society (6)
Seminar, four hours; screenings/discussion, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Study of ways television forms affect and are affected by social behavior, belief, and value systems; study of technological and economic aspects of medium. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.
221. Seminar: Film Authors (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Intensive examination of works of outstanding creators of films. May be repeated twice for credit. S/U or letter grading.
222. Seminar: Film Genres (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Studies of patterns, styles, and themes of such genres as Western, gangster, war, science fiction, comedy, etc. May be repeated twice for credit. S/U or letter grading.
223. Seminar: Visual Perception (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, three hours. Aesthetic, psychological, physiological, and phenomenological approaches to vision as they relate to ways in which viewers experience and see film, television, and digital media. Letter grading.
224. Computer Applications for Film Study (6)
Lecture, three hours; film screenings, three hours. Survey of computer applications relevant to film study, principally computer-videodisc systems and image capture technology. S/U or letter grading.
225. Seminar: Videogame Theory (6)
Seminar, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Videogame theory, with exploration of nature of medium, rather than looking at history, industrial practice, social effects, or any other of many interesting questions that games also raise. Acknowledgment of roots in film, television, and media studies and investigation of emerging videogame field. S/U or letter grading.
CM229. Contemporary Topics in Theater, Film, and Television (2)
(Same as Theater CM229.) Lecture, two hours; screenings, two hours. Limited to junior/senior and graduate theater/film and television students. Examination of creative process in theater, film, and television, with consideration of writing, direction, production, and performance. Overview of individual contributions in collaborative effort; examination of distinctiveness and interrelations among these arts. Individual units include participation of leading members of theater, film, and television professions. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course CM129. S/U or letter grading.
C242. Digital Imagery and Visualization (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Introductory hands-on investigation of techniques of digital still imaging and aesthetics of digital image, in context of examining dynamics of cultural constructions and visual codes. Students conceive and produce several digital image visualizations. Concurrently scheduled with course C142. Letter grading.
C243. Moving Digital Image (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Investigation of different ways of creating and manipulating linear moving images (digital video) on desktop computers, exploring both creative and theoretical aspects of this production environment. Students conceive and produce number of short projects. Concurrently scheduled with course C143. Letter grading.
C244. Interactive Multimedia Authoring (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Introduction to expressive and aesthetic potential of interactive digital media and its theoretical issues. Exploration of methodologies and tools for media integration, interface design, and interactive audiovisual construction. Students conceive, produce, and master individual interactive multimedia projects. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C144. Letter grading.
C245. Creative Authoring for World Wide Web (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Exploration of creative aspects of World Wide Web as medium for personal/collective expression. Students produce Web works and serve them online. Contextualization of medium by looking at its history, embedded ideology, and sociopolitical consequences. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C145. Letter grading.
246. Seminar: Issues in Electronic Culture (6)
Seminar, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Critical studies seminar with major hands-on laboratory component that explores impact of new digital technologies on contemporary culture and aesthetics. Students do laboratory projects using visualization, image manipulation tools, and Internet authoring tools. Letter grading.
C247. Planning Independent Feature Production (4)
Lecture, three hours. Analysis of procedure, problems, and budgets in planning feature-length script for film and television production, with emphasis on role of producer and creative organizational techniques of producing. Concurrently scheduled with course C147. Letter grading.
C248. Advanced Digital Media Workgroup (4)
Discussion, four hours; laboratory, two hours. Designed for students with previous laboratory course experience, course provides opportunity to create larger-scale digital media works with advanced software tools and techniques in small process-oriented, creative workshop environment. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C148. Letter grading.
249. Digital Revolution (4)
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Comprehensive survey to introduce students to emerging digital technologies, resulting new media, and their artistic, economic, and social implications. Topics include digital editing, digital previsualization, multimedia, World Wide Web, interactive television, and virtual reality. Letter grading.
270. Seminar: Film Criticism (6)
Seminar, three hours; film screenings, four to six hours. Designed for graduate students. Study of key aesthetic questions of analysis and evaluation in relation to central works of motion picture criticism. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.
271. Seminar: Television Criticism (6)
Seminar, four hours; screenings/discussion, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Analysis of major forms of television production and criticism it has elicited. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.
273. Seminar: Contemporary Film and Television Criticism (6)
Seminar, three hours; film and television screenings, four to six hours. Limited to Film and Television Ph.D. candidates. Study and practice of analytic and critical response, with emphasis on contemporary film and television. S/U or letter grading.
274. Seminar: Research Design (6)
Seminar, three hours. Designed for second-year Film and Television Ph.D. students. Examination of general principles that govern formulation of major research projects and preparation of prospectus for Ph.D. dissertation. S/U or letter grading.
276. Seminar: Non-Western Films (4)
Seminar, three hours (additional hours as required). Designed for graduate students. Study of aesthetic and ideological impulses of selected films from Asia, Africa, and Latin America. S/U or letter grading.
277. Seminar: Narrative Studies (6)
Seminar, four hours; screenings/discussion, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Study of writings on theory of narrative structure and their significance for analysis of film forms. S/U or letter grading.
283A. Developing Comedy Series (4)
Seminar, three hours. Basic tenets and analysis of television comedy shows and contemporary industry production and business practices. Development of original show concepts and pitch for review and feedback by class, instructor, and guests. Letter grading.
283B. Writing Television Comedy Scripts (4)
Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 283A. Examination of basics of half-hour pilot format, style, and content and learning of principles behind network needs and choices in choosing pilots. Forum in which to discuss ideas and issues with class and instructor. Weekly progress on original half-hour pilot required. Letter grading.
283C. Running Television Comedy Room (4)
Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 283A. Practical knowledge about skills necessary to be writer/executive producer of half-hour comedy show. Focus on community building, collaboration, and leadership skills needed to successfully function in writers' room, as well as breaking stories, writing, and rewriting television scripts. Letter grading.
284A. Developing Drama Series (4)
Seminar, three hours. Basic tenets and analysis of television drama shows and contemporary industry production and business practices. Development of original show concepts and pitch for review and feedback by class, instructor, and guests. Letter grading.
284B. Writing Television Drama Scripts (4)
Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 284A. Examination of basics of drama pilot format, style, and content and learning of principles behind network needs and choices in choosing pilots. Forum in which to discuss ideas and issues with class and instructor. Weekly progress on original drama pilot required. Letter grading.
284C. Running Television Drama Room (4)
Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 284A. Practical knowledge about skills necessary to be writer/executive producer of one-hour drama show. Focus on community building, collaboration, and leadership skills needed to successfully function in writers' room, as well as breaking stories, writing, and rewriting television scripts. Letter grading.
287A. Introduction to Art and Business of Producing I (4)
Seminar, three hours. Introduction for first-year producers program students to producer's role in navigating unique dynamic between art and commerce in entertainment industry. Overview of development, production, and distribution of feature films for worldwide theatrical market, including identifying material, attracting elements, and understanding basics of studio and independent financing and distribution. S/U or letter grading.
287B. Introduction to Art and Business of Producing II (4)
Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 287A. Builds on principles taught in course 287A and presents continuation of study of development, production, and distribution of feature films for worldwide theatrical market, including identifying material, attracting talent elements, and understanding basics of studio and independent financing and distribution. Minimum of two unproduced screenplays to be presented for review by class and instructor to begin identifying potential thesis projects. S/U or letter grading.
287C. Introduction to Art and Business of Producing III (4)
Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 287A, 287B. Builds on principles taught in courses 287A and 287B. Presentation of screenplays prepared in course 287B for review by class and instructor with goal of isolating and identifying primary and secondary thesis projects. Discussions of script analysis and creating set of viable development notes for primary projects. Completion of written outline for original projects and pitching of primary projects to panel of industry executives for further feedback. S/U or letter grading.
288A. Feature Film Development I (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course 288A is requisite to 288B, which is requisite to 288C. Practical hands-on approach to understanding and implementing producer's role in development of feature film screenplay and negotiating particulars of production process. Through in-class discussions, script analysis, story notes, and select guest speakers, exposure to various entities that comprise feature film development process. Basic introduction to story and exploration of proper technique for evaluating screenplays through writing of coverage. S/U or letter grading.
288B. Feature Film Development II (4)
Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 288A. Practical hands-on approach to understanding and implementing producer's role in development of feature film screenplay and negotiating particulars of production process. Through in-class discussions, script analysis, story notes, and select guest speakers, exposure to various entities that comprise feature film development process. Deeper evaluation of screenplay through writing of story notes. S/U or letter grading.
288C. Feature Film Development III (4)
Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 288B. Practical hands-on approach to understanding and implementing producer's role in development of feature film screenplay and negotiating particulars of production process. Through in-class discussions, script analysis, story notes, and select guest speakers, exposure to various entities that comprise feature film development process. Story development and art of pitching. Script evaluation and work in groups of two to build three-act structure and create compelling characters for original ideas pitched in class. S/U or letter grading.
289A. Current Business Practices in Film and Television (4)
Discussion, three hours. Requisite: course C247. Designed for graduate students. Examination of current status of financing/production/distribution agreements, union agreements, music, copyright, etc., necessary to understand film and television industry. S/U or letter grading.
289B. Strategy (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course 289A is not requisite to 289B. Examination of business realities of industry, with focus on techniques for analyzing behavior, making strategic decisions, and overcoming obstacles to achieving results as producer, writer, or director. Assignments designed to assist students in articulating and achieving their goals and to help them effectively transition from classroom to their careers in entertainment industry. S/U or letter grading.
289C. Independent Spirit: Creative Strategies for Financing and Distributing Independent Features (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course 289B is not requisite to 289C. Key insights into financing and distribution of independent or specialty films. Topics include film finance, production, marketing, distribution, agents, and new technology, with emphasis on applying this knowledge to individual student projects. S/U or letter grading.
290A. Research and Development I (4)
Seminar, three hours. Forum for roundtable strategy sessions and mock story meetings with instructor, students, and various industry guests. Development of one story idea for thesis project. S/U or letter grading.
290B. Research and Development II (4)
Seminar, three hours. Forum for roundtable strategy sessions and mock story meetings. Students must make concrete weekly progress on thesis project and adapt strategy based on feedback received. Development of marketing and business strategies for story idea set up in course 290A. S/U or letter grading.
290C. Research and Development III (4)
Seminar, three hours. Final stages of thesis preparation for evaluation. Guidance provided by instructor on how to effectively present selected project. Requirements include industry-related book reports, script analysis, pitching selected concept, weekly research to understand marketplace, accumulation and updating of data, and justification for potential buyers comprised of industry professionals. S/U or letter grading.
291A. Studios versus Independents: Navigation Process (4)
Lecture, three hours. Tools necessary for producer to navigate Hollywood entertainment industry. Topics discussed through lectures and guest speakers include impact of difficulty to navigate relationship between art and commerce in craft of filmmaking, rapid advance of new technologies, diverse new means of building finance capital for emerging producing entities, and what future may hold for truly independent filmmaker. S/U or letter grading.
291B. Feature Film Marketing (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course 291A is not requisite to 291B. Examination of numerous groups that are responsible for specific marketing components and make up marketing departments. Distribution and in-theater marketing, trailers, publicity, promotions, research, and media. Mechanics and levels of intuition required to make sure movies are seen by public. S/U or letter grading.
291C. Feature Film Distribution and Exhibition (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course 291B is not requisite to 291C. Investigation of philosophy, structure, and major players that make up entertainment industry, with emphasis on film distribution and exhibition. Through lectures, readings, and guest speakers, exploration of interrelated arenas of production, marketing, business affairs, media, and impact of international market on distribution and exhibition of studio releases. S/U or letter grading.
292A. Overview of Network Television Management (4)
Lecture, three hours. Designed to expand basic understanding of network and cable television business. Exploration of role of showrunner, executives from networks and production companies, packaging agents, and studios responsible for developing and creating programming. S/U or letter grading.
292B. Who Produces Television? Showrunner, Nonwriting Producer, Network Executive, Studio Executive, or Agent? (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course 292A is not requisite to 292B. In-depth look at role that key individuals play in getting television shows on air. Discussion of readings, lectures, and distinguished guests from each area of television industry: networks, studios, agencies, and production companies. S/U or letter grading.
292C. Running Shows: Producing for Broadcast and Cable (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course 292B is not requisite to 292C. Exploration of role of writers-producers or showrunners in creating television shows. Designed to train writers who typically enter field as staff writers and to develop concrete tools of producers. Training of next generation of nonwriting network and studio development executives whose job it is to assist writers-producers in highly collaborative process of creating, developing, producing, and scheduling television programming. S/U or letter grading.
293. Seminar: Film and Television Curatorship (4)
Seminar, three hours (additional hours as required). Designed for graduate students. Study and practice of issues in archival research and administration. S/U or letter grading.
294A. Contracts and Negotiation (4)
Lecture, three hours. Survey of range of contracts involved in studio productions, including literary submission and option agreements, artist employment, director employment, writer collaboration agreements, coproduction agreements, music rights license, etc. Actual studio agreements referenced to illuminate potential consequences of each transaction. Negotiation strategy exercises. S/U or letter grading.
294B. Entertainment Law, Business Practices, and Negotiation Strategies (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course 294A is not requisite to 294B. In-depth analysis of structure, economics, and legal aspects of entertainment industry, with emphasis on television and film. Topics include intellectual property and proprietary rights, project development and production, talent, guilds, distribution and financing, ancillary rights, and music rights. Advanced negotiation strategy exercises. S/U or letter grading.
294C. International Financing and Distribution (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course 294B is not requisite to 294C. Legal-based course dealing with independent finance and distribution of feature films. Topics include fundamentals of film financing, domestic distribution, international distribution, European coproductions, role of foreign sales agents and of bankers and completion bond companies. S/U or letter grading.
295A. Art of Presentation (4)
Lecture, three hours. Cultivation of skills needed for students to present themselves and their project goals with clarity and precision to industry professionals. Oral presentations designed to enhance student ability to deliver convincing arguments on range of topics. S/U or letter grading.
295B. Advanced Film and Television Producing Workshop for Producers, Writers, and Directors (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course 295A is not requisite to 295B. Designed to help producers, as well as screenwriters and directors, focus on networking opportunities and to develop strategies to bring their feature and television projects to marketplace. Case-study documents (drafts of screenplays, dailies, etc.) from current or recently produced projects provided. S/U or letter grading.
295C. Advanced Producing: Role of Successful Producer (4)
Lecture, three hours. Designed to provide producers with comprehensive understanding of business acumen involved in purchasing scripts for studios and independent production companies. Through script analysis and in-class discussions, students encouraged to examine not just story elements, but marketing assets inherent in pieces of material. S/U or letter grading.
296A. Role of Talent Agencies (4)
Lecture, three hours. Introductory overview of various departments at agencies, including motion picture literary, talent, story, packaging, and television, and examination of various interactions among each. Exercises encourage producers, writers, and directors to learn how to work effectively with individuals at talent agencies. S/U or letter grading.
296B. Who Represents Me? (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course 296A is not requisite to 296B. In-depth analysis of different forms of representation offered by agents, managers, business managers, and lawyers and detail of legal rights and responsibilities of each. Exercises require students to represent rights holders in series of potential projects. S/U or letter grading.
297A. New Media Marketing I (4)
Seminar, three hours. Course 297A is requisite to 297B, which is requisite to 297C. Overview of changing world of storytelling through development of new technologies and new media. Development of short teaser/trailer or website using digital resources (digital cameras, editing, and new media effects) to promote student feature or television thesis project. S/U or letter grading.
297B. New Media Marketing II (4)
Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 297A. Overview of changing world of storytelling through development of new technologies and new media. Development of short teaser/trailer or website using digital resources (digital cameras, editing, and new media effects) to promote student feature or television thesis project. S/U or letter grading.
297C. New Media Marketing III (4)
Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 297B. Overview of changing world of storytelling through development of new technologies and new media. Development of short teaser/trailer or website using digital resources (digital cameras, editing, and new media effects) to promote student feature or television thesis project. S/U or letter grading.
298A. Special Studies in Film and Television (2 to 4)
Lecture/discussion, two or four hours. Designed for graduate students. Seminar study of problems in film and television, organized on topic basis. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.
298B. Special Studies in Film and Television (2 to 4)
Lecture/discussion, two or four hours. Designed for graduate students. Seminar study of problems in film and television, organized on topic basis. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.
375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum (1 to 4)
Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.
400. Film Image Design Laboratory (4)
Lecture, two hours; laboratory, six hours. Limited to graduate film and television students. Conception and design of nonnarrative film imagery. One-minute experiments in relation of meaning to technique, including manipulation of optics, photochemistry, elements of electronic processes, and display of time and motion. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.
401. Film Analysis for Filmmakers (4)
Lecture/screenings, five hours. Limited to graduate film and television students. Drawing heavily from array of historical examples, examination of many expressive strategies useable in creation of moving image art forms. Unifying theory and practice, presentation of approach to viewing great films of past that empowers filmmakers to use sound and images to tell original stories in present. Focus on strategic decision making in areas of writing, design, cinematography, editing, sound, and performance to enable filmmakers to discover their own personal style for telling stories on screen. Letter grading.
402A. Advanced Narrative Directing Workshop (4 or 8)
Laboratory, six or 12 hours; fieldwork, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 405, 409, 410A, 410B, 410C, 433. Limited to nine graduate film and television students. Production of 10- to 15-minute fiction film or project. Students budget and preproduce their projects by end of first term. Letter grading.
402B. Advanced Narrative Directing Workshop (8)
Laboratory, 12 hours; fieldwork, to be arranged. Requisite: course 402A. Limited to nine graduate film and television students. Production of 10- to 15-minute fiction film or project. In second term students must complete photography on location and/or in studio. Letter grading.
402C. Advanced Narrative Directing Workshop (4)
Laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 402A, 402B. Completion of postproduction on projects started in courses 402A and 402B. Letter grading.
403A. Advanced Documentary Workshop (4 to 8)
Lecture/discussion/laboratory, 16 to 24 hours; fieldwork, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 405, 409, 410A, 410B, 410C, 433. Limited to graduate film and television students. Production of advanced individual documentary film or video projects. Students conceptualize, research, write, shoot (on location)
, and edit projects to completion. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.
403B. Advanced Documentary Workshop (4 to 8)
Lecture/discussion/laboratory, 16 to 24 hours; fieldwork, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 405, 409, 410A, 410B, 410C, 433. Limited to graduate film and television students. Production of advanced individual documentary film or video projects. Students conceptualize, research, write, shoot (on location)
, and edit projects to completion. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.
403C. Advanced Documentary Workshop (4 to 8)
Lecture/discussion/laboratory, 16 to 24 hours; fieldwork, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 405, 409, 410A, 410B, 410C, 433. Limited to graduate film and television students. Production of advanced individual documentary film or video projects. Students conceptualize, research, write, shoot (on location)
, and edit projects to completion. May be repeated once for credit. S/U or letter grading.
404A. Advanced Abstract/Experimental Media Workshop (8)
Lecture/discussion/laboratory, 12 hours; fieldwork, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 405, 409, 410A, 410B, 410C, 433. Limited to 10 students per section. Production of 20-minute abstract or experimental film, video, or multimedia project. Students plan, design, and shoot their projects in first term and work as crew for each other in rotating assignments. S/U or letter grading.
404B. Advanced Abstract/Experimental Media Workshop (8)
Lecture/discussion/laboratory, 12 hours; fieldwork, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 405, 409, 410A, 410B, 410C, 433. Limited to 10 students per section. Production of 20-minute abstract or experimental film, video, or multimedia project. In second term students must complete postproduction of their projects. S/U or letter grading.
404C. Advanced Abstract/Experimental Media Workshop (8)
Lecture/discussion/laboratory, 12 hours; fieldwork, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 404A, 404B. Completion of all stages of production and postproduction on projects started in courses 404A and 404B. Letter grading.
405. Television Production Workshop (8)
Laboratory, eight hours; other, to be arranged. Limited to graduate film and television students. Basics of television production and direction, focusing on studio multiple camera with minimal use of remote camera. Use of various formats of video production, including scripted and nonscripted projects, culminating in narrative three-camera project. S/U or letter grading.
406. Experimental Video Workshop (4)
Laboratory, six hours; other, to be arranged. Limited to graduate film and television students. Introduction to independent and experimental video with examination of impact of new video technologies in television, covering concepts of video art, new television, digital video, high-definition TV, and film and tape postproduction. S/U or letter grading.
407. Video Documentary Workshop (8)
Laboratory, 12 hours. Limited to graduate film and television students. Exploration of documentary video, including screening variety of international works and producing short documentary project using single-camera field production techniques. S/U or letter grading.
408A. Video Editing: Online Editing (4)
Discussion, four hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Limited to graduate film and television students. Individual instruction in electronic editing. S/U or letter grading.
408B. Video Editing: Offline Editing (4)
Discussion, four hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Limited to graduate film and television students. Individual instruction in electronic editing. S/U or letter grading.
409. Directing Actors for Camera Workshop (4)
Workshop, six hours; laboratory, to be arranged; laboratory preparation, two to four hours. Limited to M.F.A. production program students. Team-taught with five weeks designed to give director actor/camera techniques, and five weeks to offer basic strategies to elicit good performances from actors. Emphasis on problems faced when directing actors for film. S/U or letter grading.
410A. Symposium (2)
Seminar, three hours. Limited to and required of first-year M.F.A. production program students. Exploration of principal concepts of film and television production within context of preproduction, production, and postproduction, providing forum for synthesis of knowledge gained in various first-year technical craft courses. Exploration of strategies for learning production within academic environment. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.
410B. Cinematography (2)
Seminar, three hours. Limited to and required of first-year M.F.A. production program students. Production workshop designed to give hands-on experience in all aspects of film production (tools and practicum of medium)
as each student writes/directs/edits six-minute film. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.
410C. Postproduction (2)
Seminar, three hours. Limited to and required of first-year M.F.A. production program students. Production workshop designed to give hands-on experience in all aspects of film production (tools and practicum of medium)
as each student writes/directs/edits six-minute film. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.
410D. Postproduction Sound (2)
Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 405, 409. Limited to and required of first-year M.F.A. production program students. Technical and aesthetic aspects of postproduction sound recording, editing, and rerecording for film and television. Application of principles of sound design to student films while using UCLA's John Candy Room and Scoring Stage for Automatic Dialogue Replacement (ADR), Foley, and mixing. Use of Pro Tools LE for recording, editing, and mixing, selection and use of microphones and mixing consoles, and incorporation of Final Cut Pro soundtracks into mix environment. Students record ADR and Foley and present mix of edited dialogue/ADR, Foley, sfx, and music tracks by end of term. Letter grading.
410E. Production (12)
Lecture, three hours; fieldwork, 24 to 40 hours. Requisites: courses 401, 409, 410A through 410D. Limited to and required of first-year M.F.A. production/directing students. Designed to give hands-on experience in film production. Students prepare and direct six-minute films and serve in preassigned crew positions for each other. Letter grading.
411. Survey of Multimedia Production (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Introduction to various methods of digital production, with focus on photo manipulation, desktop nonlinear postproduction, and distribution on World Wide Web. Letter grading.
C416. Intermediate Cinematography (4)
Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Intermediate study of principles of cinematography, with emphasis on exposure, lighting, and selection of film, camera, and lenses. Concurrently scheduled with course C118. Letter grading.
417. Lighting for Film and Television (4)
Lecture, two hours; laboratory, six hours. Limited to graduate film and television students. Lectures, supervised exercises on stage or in exterior, screenings of scenes, and discussions aimed at learning to master lighting to create appropriate mood or atmosphere of premeditated scene recorded on film or through electronic system. May be repeated twice for credit. Letter grading.
418. Cinematography and Directing (4)
Lecture, two hours; laboratory, six hours. Requisite: course 417. Limited to graduate film and television students. Supervised filming of short dramatic projects on sound stage and at exterior locations that explore complexity of process, emphasizing balance and collaboration essential to both directing and photography in its varied technical, production, and creative aspects. Letter grading.
419. Advanced Cinematography (4)
Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Requisites: courses 417, 418. Limited to graduate film and television students. Advanced study of principles of cinematography, with emphasis on exposure, lighting, and selection of film, camera, and lenses. S/U or letter grading.
C420. Digital Cinematography (4)
Lecture, three hours. Advanced study of principles of digital cinematography, with emphasis on electronic exposure control, lighting, formats, cameras, and lenses. Concurrently scheduled with course C120. Letter grading.
423A. Direction of Actors for Film and Television (4)
Lecture, four hours; laboratory. Preparation: first film project. Limited to graduate film and television students. Required of all production majors shooting fiction thesis. Exercises in analysis of script and character for purpose of directing actors in film and television productions. Emphasis on eliciting best possible performance from actors. May be repeated twice for credit. S/U or letter grading.
423B. Advanced Direction of Actors for Film and Television (4)
Studio laboratory, six hours. Requisite: course 423A. Limited to graduate film and television students. Advanced study and practice of directing actors before camera. Emphasis on developing techniques to immediately enhance communication between director and actor on set in order to maintain continuity from shot to shot. S/U or letter grading.
C430. Screenwriting Fundamentals (2)
Lecture, one hour. Corequisite for graduate students enrolled in course 431. Examination of screenwriting fundamentals: structure, character and scene development, conflict, locale, theme, history of drama. Review of authors such as Aristotle. Concurrently scheduled with course C132. S/U or letter grading.
431. Introduction to Film and Television Screenwriting (4)
Lecture, three hours. Limited to graduate film and television students. Introductory course in problems of film and television screenwriting. S/U or letter grading.
433. Writing Short Screenplays (4)
Lecture, three hours. Limited to and required of first-year M.F.A. production program students. Conception, development, and writing of six-minute dramatic film script to be produced in courses 410A, 410B, 410C. Letter grading.
434. Advanced Screenwriting (8)
Discussion, three hours. Requisite: course 130A. Advanced problems in writing of original film and television screenplays. May be repeated twice for credit. Letter grading.
435. Advanced Writing for Short Film and Television Screenplays (4)
Discussion, three hours. Requisite: course 410C. Limited to graduate film and television students. Conception, development, and writing of dramatic film script to be produced as advanced or thesis project. Letter grading.
437. Nontheatrical Writing for Film and Television (4)
Discussion, three hours. Limited to graduate film and television students. Advanced problems in field of documentary and special feature programs, with emphasis on research and preproduction. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. S/U or letter grading.
451. Advanced Design for Film and Television (4)
Laboratory, to be arranged. Limited to graduate film and television students. Advanced study and practice of techniques and methods of design for motion pictures. Art direction for advanced workshop productions. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units. S/U or letter grading.
452A. Film and Television Sound Recording (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours. Limited to graduate film and television students. Principles and practices of film and television sound recording, including supervised exercises. S/U or letter grading.
452B. Music Recording Workshop (4)
Lecture, four hours; studio, eight hours. Supervised exercises in studio music recording techniques, with emphasis on special requirements for motion pictures and television. S/U or letter grading.
C452C. Digital Audio Postproduction (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Limited to departmental majors. Through discussion, demonstrations, and laboratory assignments, exploration of digital audio tools and procedures available to today's filmmakers. Coverage of many technical, equipment, and software step-by-steps, with emphasis on creative process. Concurrently scheduled with course C152C. Letter grading.
453. Postproduction Sound Design (2 to 4)
Lecture, three hours. Designed to give film students insight into world of postproduction sound and to provide knowledge and tools necessary to complete postwork on their projects. Exploration of all areas of postproduction sound design from editing to final mixing. How to effectively use sound design to enhance storytelling capability of films, evaluate music choices, pick composer, music edit, create sound design to enhance story points, discover design opportunities, and select right sound effects. How to edit dialogue, prep for Automatic Dialogue Replacement and Foley sessions, and supervise final sound mix. Screening of numerous film clips to provide examples of postsound choices that demonstrate effective use of sound design. S/U or letter grading.
454A. Advanced Film Editing (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Preparation: submission of rough cut and/or copy of screenplay. Limited to film and television thesis and advanced project students in postproduction phase of thesis or advanced project. Organization and operation of postproduction process. Letter grading.
C454B. Advanced Film Editing (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: submission of rough cut of existing project or proposal to edit work of another director. Limited to film and television students in postproduction phase with advanced knowledge of organization and operation of postproduction process. Students may also propose to edit significant scene given to them by instructor. Concurrently scheduled with course C154B. Letter grading.
454C. Advanced Film Editing: Postproduction Pathways (2 to 4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Limited to departmental majors. Through discussions, demonstrations, outside speakers, and laboratory assignments, demystification of ever-changing world of postproduction. Students plan, schedule, and budget their postproduction pathway in preproduction. May be repeated once for credit. Letter grading.
C455A. Music in Film: Another Way to Tell Stories (4)
Lecture, three hours. Course C455A is requisite to C455B. Exploration of concepts and issues that drive creation and use of music in film. Through lecture/discussion and practical assignments, examination of deep collaboration between filmmaker and composer. Viewing of noteworthy examples and following of collaboration of filmmakers with composers, with weekly sessions dedicated to temping, creation and development of new scores, studio visits, and creative/conceptual dialogue between musician and filmmaker. Preparation of film ready for temping by end of first term and ready for scoring at beginning of second term. Concurrently scheduled with course C149A. Letter grading.
C455B. Music in Film: Another Way to Tell Stories (4)
Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course C455A. Exploration of concepts and issues that drive creation and use of music in film. Through lecture/discussion and practical assignments, examination of deep collaboration between filmmaker and composer. Viewing of noteworthy examples and following of collaboration of filmmakers with composers, with weekly sessions dedicated to temping, creation and development of new scores, studio visits, and creative/conceptual dialogue between musician and filmmaker. Preparation of film ready for temping by end of first term and ready for scoring at beginning of second term. Concurrently scheduled with course C149B. Letter grading.
459A. Directing for Film and Television (4)
Lecture, three hours. Limited to graduate film and television students. Analysis and exploration, with specific scenes, of differences and many similarities in directorial approach to same literary material in theater, film, and television. S/U or letter grading.
459B. Directing for Film and Television (4)
Lecture, three hours. Limited to graduate film and television students. Analysis and exploration, with specific scenes, of differences and many similarities in directorial approach to same literary material in theater, film, and television. S/U or letter grading.
464A. Advanced Film Directing (8)
Stusio, to be arranged. Limited to graduate film and television students. Special problems in direction of fictional and documentary films. S/U or letter grading.
464B. Advanced Film Directing (8)
Studio, to be arranged. Limited to graduate film and television students. Special problems in direction of fictional and documentary films. S/U or letter grading.
465. Narrative Television Workshop (8)
Laboratory, eight hours. Supervised exercises in television multicamera direction, with emphasis on creative use of composition and sound, and communication with those in front of and behind camera. Letter grading.
466A. Advanced Professional Video Workshop (8)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 405, 410A, 410B, 410C, 423A. Limited to graduate film and television students. Hands-on problems in working with various interrelated disciplines in professional production experience, including interaction with students of design and acting from Department of Theater. Letter grading.
466B. Advanced Professional Video Workshop (8)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 405, 410A, 410B, 410C, 423A. Limited to graduate film and television students. Hands-on problems in working with various interrelated disciplines in professional production experience, including interaction with students of design and acting from Department of Theater. Letter grading.
C468. Creative Location Film Production (8)
Lecture, four hours; discussion, four hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Limited to directing or producer's program students. Problems of location, production, directing, and cinematography in various real-life practical locations. Practical application of solving problems and communication within limitations of production experience. Concurrently scheduled with course C168. Letter grading.
C470A. Introduction to Digital Effects (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Introductory study of digital effects production, with specific focus on motion graphics, compositing, effects processing, and title sequences. Concurrently scheduled with course C170A. Letter grading.
472. Commercials (4)
Lecture, four hours. Limited to M.F.A. students. Designed to give students opportunity to explore one very specific kind of filmmaking. Through exploration of advertising, students gain knowledge about what kind of work is salable in American and foreign markets and how to work within distinct confines of commercial genre. Letter grading.
475. Film I (8)
Discussion, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Designed for graduate students. Study of basic techniques of film production, including preproduction planning and production of group short film. S/U or letter grading.
476. Video I (8)
Discussion, three hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Designed for graduate students. Study of basic techniques of television and video production, including completion of one or more projects. S/U or letter grading.
478. Video II (8)
Discussion, three hours; studio, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 185, and 405 or 476. Designed for graduate students. Group experience in video production with each member rotating on crew work in production of individual or collective projects. S/U or letter grading.
480. Timing for Animation (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Process of animation timing through lectures and assignments. Letter grading.
482A. Advanced Animation Workshop (4 or 8)
Lecture, three hours; studio, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 181A, 181B, 181C. Advanced organization and integration of various creative arts used in animation, resulting in production of complete animated film. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. S/U or letter grading.
482B. Advanced Animation Workshop (4 or 8)
Lecture, three hours; studio, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 181A, 181B, 181C. Advanced organization and integration of various creative arts used in animation, resulting in production of complete animated film. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. S/U or letter grading.
483A. Advanced Computer Animation (4 to 8)
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 181A, 181C, 482A. Recommended: course 181B. Course 483A is requisite to 483B, which is requisite to 483C. Creation and production of complete and original advanced computer animated film. Letter grading.
483B. Advanced Computer Animation (4 to 8)
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course 483A. Creation and production of complete and original advanced computer animated film. Letter grading.
483C. Advanced Computer Animation (4 to 8)
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course 483B. Creation and production of complete and original advanced computer animated film. Letter grading.
484A. Visual Thinking and Organization for Animation (4)
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, four hours. Course 484A is requisite to 484B. Systematic approach to analyzing and communicating two-dimensional and three-dimensional form and applying traditional compositional approaches to animation. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Letter grading.
484B. Visual Thinking and Organization for Animation (4)
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course 484A. Systematic approach to analyzing and communicating two-dimensional and three-dimensional form and applying traditional compositional approaches to animation. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Letter grading.
485. Legal Issues in Animation (4)
Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Examination of legal issues in animation, including copyright, contracts, constitutional issues in animation, competing rights, employer/employee relationships, and representation in animation. S/U or letter grading.
486. Directed Individual Study: Preparation to Advance to Candidacy for M.F.A. in Production (2 to 4)
Tutorial, four to eight hours. Limited to M.F.A. production program students. Specialized development and organization of proposed thesis project prior to advancement to candidacy. Should be taken term before student plans to advance to candidacy. S/U or letter grading.
487. Directed Individual Study: Postproduction Laboratory (4)
Laboratory, eight hours. Limited to M.F.A. production program students. Completion of projects in final stages of postproduction. May not be repeated. S/U or letter grading.
488A. Interactive Animation (4 to 8)
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Requisites: courses 181A, 181C, 489A. Organization and integration of various creative arts used in animation and interactive media to form complete study of selective interactive animation project. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Letter grading.
488B. Advanced Interactive Animation (4 to 8)
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, to be arranged. Requisite: course 488A. Organization and integration of various creative arts used in animation and interactive animation to form completed project of selected interactive topic. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Letter grading.
489A. Computer Animation in Film and Video (4 to 8)
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, four to eight hours; other, to be arranged. Preparation: completed animated film. Requisites: courses 181A, 181C. Instruction in and supervised production of computer animation. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Letter grading.
489B. Production in Computer Animation (4 to 8)
Lecture, six hours; laboratory, four to eight hours. Requisite: course 489A. Instruction in creation, preparation, and production of complete and original computer animation film or tape. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Letter grading.
495A. Practice of Teaching Film and Television (2)
Seminar, three hours. Required of all teaching assistants and associates in critical studies program. Orientation and preparation of graduate students who have responsibility to assist in teaching undergraduate courses in department; discussion of problems common to teaching experience. S/U grading.
495B. Teaching with Technology in Film and Media Studies (2)
Seminar, three hours. How to use appropriate technology to become more effective teaching assistants. Pedagogical impact of tools, including course management software, presentation technologies, and Internet. Discussion of technological resources available on campus. Use of unfamiliar tools to gain confidence in ability to incorporate new technologies in teaching. S/U grading.
496. Practice of Teaching Film and Television (2)
Discussion, two hours. Required once of all teaching assistants and associates in department. Orientation and preparation of graduate students who have responsibility to assist in teaching undergraduate courses in department; discussion of problems common to teaching experience. May not be applied toward M.A., M.F.A., or Ph.D. May be repeated. S/U grading.
498. Professional Internship in Film and Television (4 to 12)
Tutorial, to be arranged. Full- or part-time at studio or on professional project. Designed for M.F.A. program advanced students. Internship at various film, television, or theater facilities accentuating creative contribution, organization, and work of professionals in their various specialties. Given only when projects can be scheduled. S/U or letter grading.
501. Cooperative Program (2 to 8)
Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: consent of graduate adviser and graduate dean, and host campus instructor, department chair, and graduate dean. Used to record enrollment of UCLA students in courses taken under cooperative arrangements with USC. S/U grading.
596A. Directed Individual Studies: Research (2 to 12)
Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate students. May be repeated with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.
596B. Directed Individual Studies: Writing (2 to 12)
Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate students. May be repeated with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.
596C. Directed Individual Studies: Directing (2 to 12)
Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate students. May be repeated with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.
596D. Directed Individual Studies: Design (2 to 12)
Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate students. May be repeated with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.
596E. Directed Individual Studies: Acting (2 to 12)
Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate students. May be repeated with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.
596F. Directed Individual Studies: Production (2 to 12)
Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate students. May be repeated with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.
597. Preparation for Ph.D. Qualifying Examinations in Film and Television (2 to 12)
Tutorial, to be arranged. May be taken for maximum of 12 units. S/U grading.
598. M.A. Thesis in Film and Television (2 to 12)
Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: advancement to M.A. candidacy. Research and writing for M.A. thesis. May be taken for maximum of 12 units. S/U grading.
599. Ph.D. Dissertation in Film and Television (2 to 12)
Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: advancement to Ph.D. candidacy. Research and writing for Ph.D. dissertation. May be repeated. S/U grading.

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